How Hearing Aids Work

How Hearing Aids Help

Age old problem, modern-day solution

 

Hearing loss has been around since the beginning of time. While it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly when people began experimenting with ways to improve their hearing, (like using a cupped hand), we know that in 1588, Italian physician and scientist, Giambattista della Porta described early hearing aids in his published work Magia Naturalis1.

 

Needless to say, hearing aids have come a long way since their early beginning. But the principle behind hearing aids, amplification, is still considered an indispensable part of hearing loss treatment and rehabilitation.

An amplifier for your ear

 

No matter what size or styles, all hearing aids consist of
these four components:

1. Microphone

1. Microphone

2. Amplifier

2. Amplifier

3. Speaker (receiver)

3. Speaker (receiver)

4. Power supply (batteries)

4. Power supply (batteries)

Microphones and receivers are transducers, meaning they convert energy from one form to another. The microphone gathers and converts sound into electrical signals.

 

The receiver gathers electrical signals from the amplifier and converts them back into sound.

 

Located between the microphone and receiver, the amplifier increases the power of the signal supplied by the microphone before transmitting it to the receiver, which sends it to your ears.

 

The battery supplies the necessary electrical energy for the microphone, receiver and amplifier.